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Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study

Jeffrey R. Guild, SDPT, CSCS, Hao (Howe) Liu, MPT, PhD, MS, MD, Michael Connors, PT, DPT, MPT, OCS, Clayton Holmes, PT, EdD, MS, ATC.

Abstract
Purpose: To compare gait variables on normal subjects ambulating with three different types of canes.
Methods: Twenty-five healthy students were recruited from a local university. Force, impulse, stance time, swing time, gait cadence, and velocity were collected using a Tekscan HRV4 electronic walkway under four conditions. All subjects ambulated with a reciprocal gait with a cane in the right hand.
Results: In the order from no assistive ambulatory device (AAD), single tip cane (STC), Flex Stick tri-tip cane (TTC), to small quad cane (SQC), subjects decreased gait velocity and cadence. Force increased on the cane-side lower extremity (LE) with all three canes (p < 0.01). While each cane significantly decreased cadence compared to no AAD (p < 0.005), the SQC and TTC also decreased gait velocity (p < 0.005 and p = 0.181 respectively). The decrease in gait velocity and increase in force on the cane-side LE resulted in a significant increase in impulse on the cane-side LE with the TTC and SQC (all p < 0.05).
Conclusion: The combination of shifting force to the cane-side LE and a progressing decrease in gait velocity with more tips at the bottom of the cane may increase functional demands (impulse) on the cane-side LE with the TTC and SQC. Clinicians may consider the effects of slowing ambulation and the shift of functional demands on the LEs with different types of canes for each individual. The TTC may be a useful transition from the SQC to the STC during progression of rehabilitation.

Key words: Quality of Life, Aging, Function


 
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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Guild JR, , , Liu H(, , , , , Connors M, , , , , Holmes C, , , , . Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research. 2012; 1(3): 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



Web Style

Guild JR, , , Liu H(, , , , , Connors M, , , , , Holmes C, , , , . Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. www.scopemed.org/?mno=25343 [Access: October 21, 2017]. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Guild JR, , , Liu H(, , , , , Connors M, , , , , Holmes C, , , , . Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research. 2012; 1(3): 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Guild JR, , , Liu H(, , , , , Connors M, , , , , Holmes C, , , , . Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research. (2012), [cited October 21, 2017]; 1(3): 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



Harvard Style

Guild, J. R., , , Liu, H. (., , , , , Connors, M., , , , , Holmes, C., , , & (2012) Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research, 1 (3), 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



Turabian Style

Guild, Jeffrey R., SDPT, CSCS, Hao (Howe) Liu, MPT, PhD, MS, MD, Michael Connors, PT, DPT, MPT, OCS, Clayton Holmes, PT, EdD, MS, and ATC. 2012. Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research, 1 (3), 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



Chicago Style

Guild, Jeffrey R., SDPT, CSCS, Hao (Howe) Liu, MPT, PhD, MS, MD, Michael Connors, PT, DPT, MPT, OCS, Clayton Holmes, PT, EdD, MS, and ATC. "Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study." International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research 1 (2012), 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Guild, Jeffrey R., SDPT, CSCS, Hao (Howe) Liu, MPT, PhD, MS, MD, Michael Connors, PT, DPT, MPT, OCS, Clayton Holmes, PT, EdD, MS, and ATC. "Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study." International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research 1.3 (2012), 1-9. Print. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Guild, J. R., , , Liu, H. (., , , , , Connors, M., , , , , Holmes, C., , , & (2012) Comparison of gait while ambulating with three different types of canes with normal subjects: a pilot study. International Journal of Therapies and Rehabilitation Research, 1 (3), 1-9. doi:10.5455/ijtrr.00000013








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